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There is no better you than you.

Write with that in mind.

(It’s that time of year for students of mine.)

Honour Code

ghostwriting copy

We’re entering the third week of the fall semester at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, and I am very much enjoying my two Advanced Professional Communications classes.

This semester KPU’s Richmond campus has seen the reappearance of posters advertising “ghostwriting” services to Chinese students. The service charges $60 per double-spaced page and guarantees that the results will fool plagiarism-detection programs.

It is depressing to consider the possibility that any of my students would hire a ghostwriter to complete their assignments. I tell my whippersnappers that I can always detect a change in their use of language, and whether that change has resulted from his or her own improvement or from a substitution of author. Alas, this is more difficult for me to pull off in an online course, in which students can hire another person to complete *all* of the assignments (but not the final exam, unless they forge an I.D. to get seated).

Scientific thinking

overdosearticle

Solving the Heroin Overdose Mystery: How small doses can kill.”

This is a fascinating article. (Short take: Getting messed up in unusual places prevents your body’s “conditioned” anti-intoxicating responses.)

“Virtue Signaling”

My friend Jonathan Mayhew has been on a tear over at his blog Stupid Motivational Tricks these last few months: an astonishing amount of writing – on poetry, criticism, daily life, creative hygiene, social rhetoric, translation, as well as on academia and a ton of other things, all with his characteristically vivid lucidity. It has been thrilling – and also *very* humbling – for me to read.

I had never used this phrase before but it struck me that this is what I don’t like in emails from the provost or chancellor.  I realize that this is part of their job description, but I just automatically delete, after reading the first few words, any message to the entire university community that is intended to verbally signal commitments to certain values. It doesn’t make me feel warm and fuzzy inside to see these statements, and of course I’m not crazy about times when departments compete with one another to come up with statements of solidarity, pursuit of excellence, and so forth.

When my group of friends meet every week people start by rehearsing bad things Trump has done recently. How he is the worst ever, etc… It’s not that I disagree, but come on, I know this is a social ritual and so does everyone else. And it doesn’t happen to be my favorite ritual either. You won’t find bumper stickers on my car.

Right-wing virtue signaling is the same thing, except the causes are different: “life,” “freedom,” “the troops,” “guns.” Empty patriotic gestures and ritualistic affirmations of support for Israel.

The opposite of virtue signaling is the deliberately transgressive shitting on virtues. That seems refreshing at times, doesn’t it? W.C. Fields style. What makes it refreshing is that we all react against manipulative virtue signaling even as we are doing it. Think of the children!  For anyone not old enough to know, Fields would say things like “Anyone who hates children and animals can’t be all bad.” We all know that the cute commercial with the happy family at McDonald’s is manipulative, as morally bankrupt as the lite beer commercial with bikinis.

Bad Mess at Evergreen

The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington has earned its renown as an experimental – indeed avant-garde – institution; its ‘progressive’ bona-fides have been warranted as well. Back in the day, I explored the possibility of taking a faculty position in entrepreneurship there. Although it didn’t come through, this institution has remained close to my heart.

A recent controversy at Evergreen has made national news and has placed at least one professor as well as students and staff in potential peril. From the New York Times:

[Professor Bret] Weinstein, who identifies himself as “deeply progressive,” is just the kind of teacher that students at one of the most left-wing colleges in the country would admire. Instead, he has become a victim of an increasingly widespread campaign by leftist students against anyone who dares challenge ideological orthodoxy on campus.

This professor’s crime? He had the gall to challenge a day of racial segregation.

A bit of background: The “Day of Absence” is an Evergreen tradition that stretches back to the 1970s. As Mr. Weinstein explained on Wednesday in The Wall Street Journal, “in previous years students and faculty of color organized a day on which they met off campus — a symbolic act based on the Douglas Turner Ward play in which all the black residents of a Southern town fail to show up one morning.” This year, the script was flipped: “White students, staff and faculty will be invited to leave campus for the day’s activities,” reported the student newspaper on the change. The decision was made after students of color “voiced concern over feeling as if they are unwelcome on campus, following the 2016 election.”

Mr. Weinstein thought this was wrong. The biology professor said as much in a letter to Rashida Love, the school’s Director of First Peoples Multicultural Advising Services. “There is a huge difference between a group or coalition deciding to voluntarily absent themselves from a shared space in order to highlight their vital and under-appreciated roles,” he wrote, “and a group or coalition encouraging another group to go away.” The first instance, he argued, “is a forceful call to consciousness.” The second “is a show of force, and an act of oppression in and of itself.”

Seattle’s The Stranger reports on the “campus lockdown” ordered at Evergreen late this week “after local law enforcement officials received a call with a “direct threat to campus safety'”:

Student activists say they’ve been unfairly maligned. “While it is probably true that some of our strategies were very passionate, they were also peaceful,” an Evergreen student, who wished to remain anonymous, wrote in an e-mail. “And while it might be true there was some ‘harassment’ (a subjective term), it was on the lines of condemnation and scorn, rather than threats and stalking.”

One student, who asked to remain anonymous out of safety concerns, said death threats to campus activists followed Weinstein’s media appearances. “A swastika appeared on campus. Student personal information was published on 4chan channels and other neo-Nazi and violent racist internet communities,” the student told The Stranger.

Said another student: “Calling these people ‘Weinstein supporters’ would be irresponsible of me. These people are mostly organized racists from off campus that use internet presence, anonymity, and misinformation to disrupt a narrative, and the threat of violence to suppress those who would fight back.”

Professor Weinstein fears that his and other students have been placed at risk:

On Twitter, [he] claimed that his student supporters were being threatened online by his critics. He subsequently tweeted: “I’m told people are doxing those that protested against me. I don’t know if it’s true. If it is, *please stop.* No good can come from that.” The biology instructor also said that Evergreen campus police warned him that he was “not safe on campus. They can not protect me.”

Student demonstrators refuted Weinstein’s claims that their supporters had attempted to dox the teacher’s supporters. They believe the media’s focus on Weinstein is a distraction from their chief concern: ongoing issues revolving around racism, sexism, and transphobia at Evergreen.

Many of Weinstein’s faculty colleagues want him punished.

Look at Bret Weinstein’s “Rate My Professors” page.

Here are some of the demands from students who objected to Weinstein’s published statements .

A member of the State Legislature has introduced a bill to de-fund and privatize Evergreen.

As a professor and as a person with many fond memories of the energetic intellectual and moral debates I shared or witnessed as a young student at SUNY/Buffalo and Stanford University, I find this Evergreen mess dismaying to the point of heartbreak.

h/t LH

Summer teaching

Tomorrow I meet the students in my Advanced Professional Communications class for the first time, out at Kwantlen Polytechnic University‘s Surrey campus. What a splendid gig I have!

“Strong Claims, Inadequate Evidence”

From Emory University professor Scott Lilienfeld’s recent paper on “microaggressions”:

The microaggression concept has recently galvanized public discussion and spread to numerous college campuses and businesses. I argue that the microaggression research program (MRP) rests on five core premises, namely, that microaggressions (1) are operationalized with sufficient clarity and consensus to afford rigorous scientific investigation; (2) are interpreted negatively by most or all minority group members; (3) reflect implicitly prejudicial and implicitly aggressive motives; (4) can be validly assessed using only respondents’ subjective reports; and (5) exert an adverse impact on recipients’ mental health. A review of the literature reveals negligible support for all five suppositions. … Although the MRP has been fruitful in drawing the field’s attention to subtle forms of prejudice, it is far too underdeveloped on the conceptual and methodological fronts to warrant real-world application. I … call for a moratorium on microaggression training programs and publicly distributed microaggression lists pending research to address the MRP’s scientific limitations.

Columbia University professor Musa Al-Gharbi’s response to Lilienfeld’s paper provides some edifying context.

This is a very contentious topic on campuses, as you can imagine. This New York times story from last fall gives you a good picture.

h/t to C on clarissasblog