Some help for Kwantlen students during the pandemic

A message from my university:

The Kwantlen Student Association [KSA] has donated $100,000 in emergency funding for students at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. To match this generous gift, KPU will also donate $100,000.

“The KSA always strives to represent its students, and we hope that with this donation, we can give students financial assistance to reduce financial hardships they might face due to COVID-19,” says David Piraquive, president of the KSA.

The funds will be available from March 30 to any student registered for the Spring 2020 term. Students are eligible for up to $250.

“During these unprecedented times, many people will face financial hardships and this includes KPU students. We are deeply grateful to the KSA for this generous gift, and we are proud to partner with them in this effort by matching their donation. Our collective efforts will help our students financially as they try to navigate the current situation,” says Dr. Alan Davis, president and vice-chancellor of KPU.

For students who require more emergency funding, there are other grants and bursaries available to students who meet specific criteria. For more information about student financial aid and to apply, visit kpu.ca/awards.

Additional message tweeted me from KPU:

Students can begin applying March 30, closer to the end of day. There will be a form on http://kpu.ca/awards. For more information please contact the student aid office.

I’ve sent this out to all my current students directly – and posted the message here for my former students who follow basil.ca.

I need some time alone.

Stencil underneath Burrard Street bridge this morning.

I wonder whether the artist pulled down that top corner of the fence, to indicate how the child escaped confinement …

In which yours truly gets written up …

… by dear friend John Glionna on his superb blog.

John_Bob_Vancouver

(photo by Lincoln Clarkes, 2002)

“I’d rather leave the room quietly than seriously injure someone.”

I am teaching a conflict-resolution module to my advanced-communications class tomorrow afternoon. I love this Pam Grier interview.

David Roback, RIP

David Roback was a fine musician with a beautiful, psychedelic style of playing and writing. Roback is best known for his work with Mazzy Star. I got to know him via his work with Opal, an earlier band of his, which recorded one of my top favourite songs.

“You gave me a D …”

This was on my voicemail this morning, courtesy of a dear old friend:

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Visit John Glionna’s wonderful website.

Reading

Basil.CA entered its nineteenth year as of a couple weeks ago. The two little posts below convey the tone of the early years. (My interests seem to have stayed steady …)

9 July 02:  “How comes it,” asks my man Francois duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 – 1670), “that our memories are good enough to retain even the minutest details of what has befallen us, but not to recollect how many times we have recounted them to the same person?”  I know that my own friends wonder, often and out loud, why I never seem to notice that I’m repeating myself, so it is really pleasing to read that Mr. La  Rochefoucauld and his salon-mates shared this particular cognitive deficit.  I finally bought his Maxims last November, and the book might never leave my bathroom.  The man’s skeptical appraisals of human vanity, self-love, envy, and romance are wry and perfect.  “When it comes to love, the one who recovers first recovers best” — “En amour celui qui est guéri le premier est toujours le mieux guéri” —  was a favourite in my old Buffalo days, not sure why.  Today I am a businessman with many clients who are involved in financing and promoting various speculative ventures.  It is a world in which, if skepticism is not always rewarded, then naivete is pretty much always punished.  The following La Rochefoucauld maxim comes to mind most every day:  “Our promises are made in proportion to our hopes, but kept in proportation to our fears.”  (It is no more sentimental in the original French:  “Nous promettons selon nos espérances, et nous tenons selon nos craintes.”)

24 September 02:  As my readers know:  When I get into a funk, I read and read and read.  Sometimes this improves my mood; it rarely damages it further; and, because I have a very expansive view of education, I believe it elevates my mind.  The best experience is when my reading makes me laugh out loud, as a recent item did [link no longer active, alas!]. In a Canada.com story about Vancouver officials trying to close down three bars in the city’s downtown eastside neighborhood, we get this paragraph:

“The bathrooms are shooting galleries,” says one. “Cops are always here raiding the people for dope, drugs and hookers and shit,” speculates another. 

The faux-journalistic use of the word “speculates” is so wittily Canadian that I will live to read another day.