Archive for Vancouver

‘Heroines Revisited’ review

Mala Rai’s review of Lincoln Clarkes‘ “Heroines Revisited” gets the important things exactly right.

For the people that loved her, whether she is missing, deceased, or transformed, these pages are a sensitive keepsake. As half the women photographed may be closely connected to [or even have been among] are murdered and missing indigenous women, these pictures may be the sole glimpse into a family member or friend’s troubled time. How can the surroundings be so dire, yet every woman in that instance is utterly stunning? They are in terribly vulnerable places, yet invoke the persona of tough-as-nails heroine: Your sister riding a 10 speed, smoking a cigarette, clad in page boy at and a crop top. Your former high school friend at St. Paul’s hospital, perched in a confident, yogi pose upon her bed. The woman who’d become your mother, about to inject, focused on her syringe, but 13 pages later, impeccably put together, she is confidently staring right back at you. A tender Mother’s Day sisterhood collective. Perhaps their arrival at that destination in life was a shock. Maybe it was expected. It isn’t profound sadness or pain that I see in each frame, but the significance of these women in our society. They likely had no idea that their images in the finished product would comprise a collection of artful history. The pictures make us hunger for more details of each person’s personal history, but there are no crumbs to spare.

Sweet sea

Morning walk restored my mood.

Lincoln Clarkes

Anvil Press just published Heroines Revisited, by Lincoln Clarkes. Looking at this series of photographs will always be an overwhelming experience for me.

The photograph below was part of the original photographic exhibition in 1998 at Vancouver’s Helen Pitt Gallery.

Here’s an interview I did with Lincoln for my old ezine Ellavon, in which many of the Heroines photographs first appeared.

Sunset Beach Barge

A highly rated Vancouver vacation destination!

Tomorrow might be its last day:

While it could be possible to push it off using airbags and heavy equipment, the plan it to wait for a so-called king tide to refloat it and try again with the tugs.

It’s believed a tide that is just five to 10 centimetres higher than 4.5 metres would allow the barge to easily slip back into the water. And federal officials are forecasting an exceptionally high tide of five metres on Dec. 6.

A company representative from Richmond-based Sentry Marine Towing Ltd., which is involved, said that seems to be the best chance to pull the barge off. He declined to give his name, saying several government agencies are working on the operation. (Vancouver Sun)

The “king tide” arrives tomorrow morning at around 8. I will be there with bells on!

Update! – 10 Dec ’21

Neighbour

Beach Ave., Vancouver.